POLITICAL ECONOMY OF LIVELIHOOD ORGANIZATION IN SOUTHERN GHANA: THE CASE OF A RURAL FOREST COMMUNITY.

This article is based on an empirical study of livelihood organization in a forest community in southern Ghana. It uses a qualitative methodology to examine the farm and non-farm livelihoods of the community in terms of their access to resources and the social and production relations within which livelihoods are constructed and organized. It identifies intra household, inter household and community relations, as well as relations between community and state actors to mediate community livelihoods. These relations affect gender roles and responsibilities, household, individual and community decisionmaking on access, control and allocation of livelihood resources. They become social relations promoted along various axes namely, age and status, class, power and gender and reveal structural relationships that create and reproduce systemic differences in the positioning of different groups of people. In the community’s livelihood construction and organization therefore, there have been both winners and losers based on the introduction of cash crops, access to production resources and how different community members have positioned themselves to take advantage of their circumstances.

Author(s)
Henrietta Abane
Faculty/Institute/Centre